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                                       Details for article 5 of 6 found articles
 
 
  OPTIMIZING PLANT GENETIC STRATEGIES FOR MINIMIZING ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION IN THE FOOD CHAIN
 
 
Title: OPTIMIZING PLANT GENETIC STRATEGIES FOR MINIMIZING ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION IN THE FOOD CHAIN
Author: Arthur, E.
Crews, H.
Morgan, C.
Appeared in: International journal of phytoremediation
Paging: Volume 2 (2000) nr. 1 pages 1-21
Year: 2000-01-01
Contents: A multidisciplinary workshop was held with the aim of identifying (1) the opportunities to minimize contamination of the food chain; (2) the benefits arising and the constraints relating to these opportunities; (3) strategies to capitalize on these opportunities within a context that is acceptable to both industry and the public and to coordinate input from government, industry, and science. A number of key issues were identified that require attention in the context of maximizing the potential for exploiting genetic variability among plants for minimizing environmental contaminants in the food chain. These were (1) to survey and categorise the plant kingdom to identify variation for traits useful in phytoremediation; (2) to develop quick, accurate screening techniques necessary to identify useful variation among plants; (3) to describe, characterize, and categorize contamination problems; (4) to assess time scales for clean-up to specify suitable strategies; (5) to target research into the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms used by plants that make them useful in phytoremediation; (6) to investigate the Brassicaceae — especially Brassica juncea and Arabidopsis — for their potential in phytoremediation and to study the genetic control of useful traits; (7) to develop a range of strategies and make 'tool kits' available to meet all possible situations requiring phytoremediation; (8) to carry out cost benefit and life cycle analyses to define which strategies are most suitable for phytoremediation; (9) to link further development of strategies so that they are driven by the end user; (10) to encourage and enable further discussion among multidisciplinary groups to optimize the strategies likely to lead to successful implementation; (11) to identify needs and sources to provide a combined framework of all relevant parties and interests; and (12) to develop an understanding of the broader picture before dealing with specific aspects or targeting research areas in detail.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Source file: Elektronische Wetenschappelijke Tijdschriften
 
 

                             Details for article 5 of 6 found articles
 
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